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PS4 PS4 exclusive The Tomorrow Children announced at Gamescom 2014

Martok

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Your first look at the extraordinary new project from veteran creator Dylan Cuthbert


Hello to all the future tomorrow children out there. I’m Dylan Cuthbert, and I run Q-Games out here in Kyoto. We’re well known to our fans for the hugely successful PixelJunk series but today marks a special day as we’ve ventured far from what we normally make to create something a little bit, um… ‘out there’.

Hopefully you’ve seen the trailer by now (isn’t that music awesome!) and had a glimpse of the rather odd, vibrant and peculiarly Soviet world we’ve spent the past few years inventing!


The Tomorrow Children is the story of a future re-imagined from the after-effects of an experiment in 1960s Russia that attempted to ‘sublime’ the human race, or meld all human minds into one global consciousness. Unfortunately it went wrong and decimated the planet, and it took the next 90 years for the few humans left to rebuild to the point where they have created you, the player, as a ‘projection clone’. You’re tasked with venturing out into ‘The Void’ to reclaim the human race and restore it to its former glory!

The survivors of the experiment have created a society based on Marxist ideals from the 1960s. As you can imagine those ideals have become slightly distorted by the flow of time, and even technology has advanced in unexpected directions.


You begin as a proletariat or normal citizen class. Every little thing you do garners recognition points that you can cash in at the labour office to earn coupons from the state. These ‘ration’ coupons can be cashed in for better abilities. For example, don’t want to line up anymore? Then get yourself the “Sharp Elbows” perk and push in like a bossy bourgeoisie!

The first thing you’ll be expected to do is explore and mine for materials, because the town needs as many resources as it can get to defend itself from the marauding attacks of the Izverg – giant monsters that roam the Void. The islands you visit to mine resources are also generated by the Void and contain all kinds of strange things, including monsters and treasure. They usually come in the shape of symbolic structures or objects from humanity’s past.




The human race will only survive if we cooperate, and as you do things your projection will become briefly visible in other player’s realities. Everything you do to manipulate the world is shared with everyone else in each stage.

For example, if you find someone toiling away in the dark, hold your flashlight steady for them and they will see your projection appear behind them to light their work. If you or they fall into darkness for too long they will lose coherency and be reset back to the town, losing their hard-earned recognition points. If anything scares you there is also the chance you might lose coherency and have your projection reset.

With the mined resources you can craft buildings and items (such as gun turrets, light fixtures, cars and tanks) that everyone can use together to grow the town and defeat the Izverg.




The main goal is to restore the population of the world and you will discover strange Matryoshka dolls which contain the raw DNA essence of the devastated populace. Taking these to the restoration points in the town will bring them back to life and they’ll start working on the town, carrying things around and repairing it for you (when they feel like it!).

Every couple of days an election is held and everyone votes on the mayor they wish to be elected. And choosing the right mayor is crucial. One mayor might lower the resource cost of all buildings by 20%, while another might increase weapons’ efficiency, allowing the turrets to reload more quickly – handy when there is a swarm of spiders attacking!

Anyway, this is just the beginning of all the crazy things you will discover in The Tomorrow Children and I hope you’ll be able to join us when we go live. Now go catch that bus, it’s waiting to take you to work in the mines!




Source: EU PlayStation Blog
 

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When I first saw the title I pictured a spin off of the classic British sci-fi series. This looks to be a nice interesting god/sim city style sim
 

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The Tomorrow Children – Delving deeper into Dylan Cuthbert’s weird, wonderful PS4 exclusive
We sit down with Q-Games founder to find out more about the forthcoming open-world adventure

Among the brand new PS4 games announced by Sony Worldwide Studios at Gamescom last month was The Tomorrow Children – a striking, unusual open-world adventure title from the reliably eccentric PixelJunkdeveloper, Q-Games. As you can tell from the reveal trailer, it’s an intriguingly out-there creation, placing you in the shoes of a clone as she explores a strange post-apocalyptic landscape in search of resources to restore humanity and protect her fledgling community from fearsome beasts.

Duly, its reveal threw up all manner of questions about what exactly players should expect when it lands on PS4 in 2015. In search of some answers, I sat down with Q-Games founder and veteran designer Dylan Cuthbert to find out more about his studio’s big, bold and bizarre new project.

I think it’s fair to say that The Tomorrow Children was one of the more unusual titles that debuted at Gamescom. Lots of people will have watched the trailer during the press conference and found it totally intriguing, but others may well have wondered, “What the hell did I just see?” For that latter group, can you give us a brief ‘elevator pitch’ encapsulating exactly what The Tomorrow Children is all about?

Dylan Cuthbert: Very difficult! It’s basically an open-world sandbox game with some rules in there to encourage a feeling of ‘togetherness’ – that you’re working together to build things.

If you were to distil it down to the most action-based elements – you explore the surrounding islands; you mine resources; you work out a way to get them back to town, then you use them to expand your town. You can even craft tree saplings and do some farming if you want to – you can farm apples to feed the population you’re restoring.

The accumulation of all that is that you fight these marauding monsters who’ll try to destroy your buildings. That’s the base loop.

Every little thing you do in the game is recognised by the state. Whenever you want to, you can go to the labour office and you’ll get a print out of every action you’ve done; such as, say, carrying an apple 10 metres. Then it’ll give you an income based on what you did and you can use that income to buy yourself perks, or better tools, or just play around with the game’s systems.



How exactly did the project get started?

Dylan Cuthbert: We wanted to make a game that had a social experiment element to it, and a game that played out in a manipulatable world.

As for the art style, I really like wooden puppets from the Czech Republic, especially from the ’60s. And more generally I like the fashion from the late ’60s too. As we wanted the game to have this social experiment element to it we figured the best basis for that would be a Marxist setting – that ‘behind the iron curtain’ Cold War feel always gives you a bit of a thrill.

We started experimenting from that point. We wanted a new visual style that utilised new 3D tech – not the standard stuff we see that has been extrapolated from old PS2 systems. We took a radically different approach and wanted to find a way to get an almost pre-rendered look, like a Pixar film perhaps.

We looked around and found this tech called cascaded voxel cone ray tracing, where all the light around the game camera is encoded in a 3D structure. So as you walk through the scene you’re getting 3D lighting occurring around you. It’s not pre-baked – it’s all real time.

We spent quite a lot of time developing that, and really used the PS4′s compute power to its extremes to implement the technology. That all started about three years ago. It was a smaller team back then and we slowly started adding people.

I’ve heard you were under special orders from [PS4 system architect] Mark Cerny to make something a little bit different for the new hardware…

Dylan Cuthbert: Right at the start of the project Mark said to us, “I want people like Q-Games and Media Molecule to create new technology – or do things in a different way to how the big AAA studios have had to operate.” Those giant studios have their pipelines, and they just have to get this stuff made. It’s fine, and it usually creates a great looking game, but Mark also wanted something that was a bit different, and that’s what he encouraged us to do right at the start.




Looking at the trailer and sitting in on your behind-closed-doors sessions with media at Gamescom, I thought I noticed all kinds of other influences in there, as well as the Soviet imagery – Salvador Dali, Lars Von Trier, the Godzilla Kaiju elements. It’s a really eclectic, interesting mix…

Dylan Cuthbert: Yes, but it’s all been honed down to create one vision. At the end of the day, it’s a game, so it’s nice to have big monsters to fight but our initial designs didn’t centre around that part of the experience so much. They were more about getting the social stuff right – the parody of Marxism, getting the black market in there – that kind of thing.

Bringing everything in under one creative vision has been the major challenge, but I think we’ve pulled it off – when you play the game I think you’ll find it very consistent.

What was the reaction of SCE Worldwide Studios bosses when you first showed them what you were working on?

Dylan Cuthbert: We didn’t show Allan [Becker, Japan Studio chief] and Shu [Yoshida, President of Sony Worldwide Studios] the exact vision until very late – maybe October or November last year. And they were just blown away by it, especially with some of the features that we haven’t announced yet. They’ve been great. They’ve been very hands-off – we’ve been left alone to make whatever we want to make, and I think that shows.

Moving onto the game itself, is there some sort of leader or overseer in charge of your game world?

Dylan Cuthbert: There’s the Administrator who you see at the end of the trailer. He’s the guy who introduces you to the world and is part of the original population – the remnants of mankind. They’ve found a way to make themselves live longer, which makes them look a bit scary and skeletal. They can’t go out and mine – it’s too dangerous as they’re the last remaining humans. That’s why they’ve created these clones – you – to go out and do their work for them.



My understanding is that launch day is just the start, and you’ll be issuing regular updates. Can you give us an idea of how the game is going to evolve long-term?

Dylan Cuthbert: We’ve got all kinds of ideas and want to release updates very regularly. There’ll be plenty of content in the initial release but there are all kinds of things we want to keep adding because it’s such an interesting world to build on. Being able to build giant robots, for example – they can then go out and defend your town for you. There’ll be big content like that, but lots of bits of small content too, such as being able to buy your own house on the black market, and then just going in there and hanging out, should you want to.

We saw a few glimpses of the game’s monsters in the reveal trailer. Can you tell us a bit more about the different types of creatures players can expect to encounter?

Dylan Cuthbert: Right now there are four basic types, and a few special types as well. Within the islands you’ll find creatures that spawn out little flying creatures. If you get attacked by them you get reset back to the town. You’ll lose the log of all the work you’ve done and won’t be able to claim income. So, you don’t want to be attacked by them, but you can take them out with a shotgun. There’s sentinel guardian type things in the islands as well, and treasure bosses you can fight too.

These creatures just stay in the islands – they won’t come and attack your town. In this category we have three types. There are spiders, which come in hordes, attack buildings and explode themselves. Then there are the giant Godzilla-style Izverg creatures that will crush buildings and eat people. And then there are flying creatures that drop bombs.

Those are the main ones at the moment. Post-release we can consider different things too. The giant Izverg is kind of like a boss character as you have to collaborate to bring them down. The spiders you can bring down by yourself.



On the subject of friends and in-game relationships, how exactly will the social system work?

Dylan Cuthbert: You can down-vote or up-vote other players depending on their behaviour, and that changes their status slightly. People normally show up as red figures in your world but if they get too many thumbs-down they’ll start getting darker, so you’ll know who is a bit of a wrong ‘un and you can steer clear of them. If you get too many thumbs-down the police – if you’ve built a police station, that is – might throw you in jail, so you’ll have to start evading them, which adds another element to the game.

You’ve mentioned players will be split up across a number of different persistent towns. Will you be able to move between them and visit friends?

Dylan Cuthbert: You can move freely back and forth between towns, though it may cost you some ration coupons. If you’ve got a friend playing in another town and they need help, you can go in and lend a hand. There’s a limited amount of guest slots in each town though.

It’ll be more of a cooperative relationship at present, rather than antagonistic, but we’ll see where that goes after launch. You can get missions from NPCs in your town. From the regular NPC, the missions are fairly normal, but a bit later on you’ll be introduced to the black market – the seedy underground. Once you get exposed to that, you’ll start getting missions that are anti the state, and that’s a whole other part of the game we’re not quite ready to talk about.


Source: EU PlayStation Blog
 

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The Tomorrow Children on PS4 – Gameplay and backstory detailed
Creator Dylan Cuthbert goes into more detail on his extraordinary new project

Hi everyone, this is Dylan again, one of the many minds behind The Tomorrow Children. The trailer left people wanting to hear more, much more, about the game, so here I am to relay a little more information!

To begin with, The Tomorrow Children is an online game, but it is a combination of synchronous and asynchronous gameplay. This is to encourage a slightly different form of gameplay to that you are used to with online games. If you just want to explore by yourself you can, and you won’t be bothered by other players because they can’t see you, and of course if you want to interact with other players you can, just start doing things and you will pop up in their worlds. Then the world itself is synchronized, so if you dig a hole, that hole will be dug in the same place for the other players too and they’ll see you for that brief second while you are digging the hole.





It’s pretty interesting to see people working together within this system, digging out the giant monsters or Izverg as they are called and building up their town with the resources they discover. There are a number of ways to communicate with other players, such as blowing a whistle, or gesturing, or using a megaphone, and later on we will be adding the ability to hijack the tanoy speaker system in the town to really get what you want to say across to other players.

The game is a sandbox but there are some loosely defined roles you can take on such as “Radio Officer” which is a kind of scout role, and Engineer Commander who likes explosives and building roads, but you can mix and match your tools and weapons anyway you like. The policemen around town will assign you roles and give you a default tool if they feel there is a shortage of a particular type of player. You can always ask them for advice too.



The back-story to the game involves a huge experiment performed in Soviet Russia in the late 1960s, an experiment to try and unify the entirety of human sub-conscious thought as one. However, it went wrong and nearly obliterated all living things on the planet, and the white void is what’s left of mankind and its dreams. The things that are created from the void come from those lost dreams… and of course nightmares too in the case of the Izverg.

Fast-forward almost 100 years and the remaining scientists have, while artificially extending their own lives, managed to rebuild society to some extent and they have invented a “projection clone” technology which is where you come in as one of these clones tasked to search out and discover as much human DNA (stored safely in Matryoshka dolls) as possible, bringing it back to the town to restore it to human form again. The scientists can’t risk venturing out themselves because they are the only original human beings left.

Well, I hope that gives everyone a little insight into everything!



Source: EU PlayStation Blog
 

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Creating the beautiful, ground-breaking visuals of The Tomorrow Children on PS4
Q-Games details the innovative methods it’s using to help its game stand out

Hi everyone, today I’m going to talk a little about the tech behind The Tomorrow Children. Hopefully you’ve all seen the trailer and are wondering how the glory we managed to get that crazy surreal look we have.

When the project started we had a meeting with Mark Cerny and he said “I want Q-Games to do something that’s a little…outside the box”. So I took that to heart and decided to use the PS4′s awesome compute power to drive three things: Cinematography, Lighting, and Geometry.

Cinematography
So I immediately drove the technology towards “cinematography” which I think is a much more visually stunning style compared to CG that strives to be realistic. Realistic graphics give us directly what we can see, but cinematography also gives us what we imagine we’re seeing. So for example if you are looking at a green field on a cloudy day, the raw photons hitting our eyes are actually a bit of a dull green but the brain’s imagination (and this is different for every person) spruces up the image we are seeing, making it more stimulating and exciting.


Pretty much every movie you have ever seen has gone through this kind of ‘colour grading’ process, the most recent ‘fad’ of which is a process called ‘orange-teal’ which boosts orange in the highlights and blue in the shadows plus a number of other tweaks. Recent TV series such as Breaking Bad, Utopiaand True Detective rely on this heavily to set up atmosphere and scene tone.

So I thought to myself, why not do this for games too – but not via a few simple ‘tone mapping’ parameters, let’s go the whole hog and create a professional cinematic colour grading process. And we have two major advantages over cameras and their sensors. The first is that a modern 3D pipeline generates a larger dynamic range of colour which gives us more freedom, and the second is that we have ‘Z’ information for every pixel which lets us introduce Z as a parameter into the colour grading process. This lets us do things such bring up black levels in the distance, or even swizzle colours around a little based on distance from the camera.


Lighting
Okay, with that cinematic feel to everything, we started investigating how to get a ‘pre-rendered’ look to our 3D in realtime and we decided we were going to have to go all out and do something that no-one is doing. So we researched and invented something called ‘cascaded voxel cone ray tracing’. The concept is a little complex but it involves calculating and storing light and its direction around the player as she moves in ever increasing cascades of data.

Because we have volumetric data (the voxel cone part) it means we can bounce light around fairly cheaply and any one pixel on the screen has up to three bounces of light hitting it, and from all directions too. Now, by the third bounce, the light is quite diminished in power but it makes that subtle difference that tricks the eye into thinking it is looking at something with true presence.


Interestingly most Pixar-style CG movies that you have seen are only using one bounce and although they beat us in detail because they can spend 30 minutes or more rendering one frame, our lighting is a lot more subtle and effective. For example, we can move a big red object around in real time and watch the sunlight reflecting off of it bounce onto the surrounding objects, and then watch that light bounce again onto other nearby objects that wouldn’t normally be lit (indirect lighting).

Geometry
Finally, we needed some other new tech to build the game around so we started looking into techniques to do deformable landscapes. We wanted something you could dig and mine, or create shapes in but we didn’t want anything too strongly grid based; we wanted it to feel more real. So we went with something called Layered Depth Cubes, which is a way to represent the world without using polygons. Instead, it’s represented as volumes, which are then converted to polygons as needed (for example if the player goes near them and they need to be actually drawn on screen).


The benefit of not using polygons means the data is far easier manipulate and we can do boolean options (addition/subtraction) on the data to cut out holes or to add details and the whole structure remains solid and intact.

The added advantage of course is this all ties in with the lighting above to give it quick, easy-to-access data structures to bounce its light through!


These are just three areas of technology we’ve created for The Tomorrow Children and without the amazing power under the hood in the PS4 none of them would be possible. The future of 3D graphics is here and it is beautiful!

Source: EU PlayStation Blog
 

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New The Tomorrow Children videos showcase gameplay
Get a little more detail on how Q-Games eccentric PS4 sandbox adventure plays

Hello aspiring projection clones! I’m John Davis, a community manager here at Q-Games. As you might know, we recently finished the closed alpha test for our upcoming PlayStation 4 exclusive, The Tomorrow Children. The alpha was amazing and gave players a great sneak peak at what we we’re working on, plus it was a chance to get lots of data on exactly what players will be doing in the Void once The Tomorrow Children arrives on PlayStation 4 next year. We had a great time playing with everyone and it was incredibly informative on top of that. The best of both worlds!

For the vast majority of people who didn’t get into the alpha there’s been a lot of questions about exactly what The Tomorrow Children is, and we can understand that. If you’ve been keeping up with our posts here on the PS Blog, you know that The Tomorrow Children takes place in a dystopian future where a Cold War experiment to meld the minds of all of humanity resulted in the near extinction of the human race. What was left was a planet-wide Void, where the remnants of human thought manifest themselves strange islands and creatures. As a projected clone created from a sliver of human DNA, you are tasked with venturing out into that Void and reclaiming the souls of humanity that are now trapped in hidden matryoshka dolls. You’ll explore the void, find the lost humans, collect resources to expand and upgrade your town, and defend it from the walking nightmares called Izverg.

Are you still with me? Keep up! This is just the tip of the genre mash-up that is The Tomorrow Children! For those of you who want a deeper look, I’ll explain some of the pillars of the game in detail below.

A clone’s closet
When heading out into the Void, players can choose to outfit their characters in different uniforms that cater to whichever role they want to fill. There are five uniforms in The Tomorrow Children: Citizen, Engineer Commander, Miner, Radio Officer, and Combatant.

While every citizen can perform the same actions, each uniform has different merits and demerits. For example, just for the alpha test, the Miner starts with a Pick Axe, while the Combatant gets a shotgun. There are many other abilities such as increasing your bag’s capacity or the player’s running speed.

The final game will give players even more freedom to shape themselves into the productive members of society they long to be!

Defending your town!
As I mentioned before, collecting humanity’s lost souls is your main mission in The Tomorrow Children. Each matryoshka doll you find in the Void can be brought to town and the resurrected to increase your town population. Your new citizens are fragile and disoriented, so you have to defend them from the dangers of the Void, the Izverg.

You have lots of different ways to defend your town in The Tomorrow Children. Basic defenses include shotguns and rocket launchers that you can purchase. As your town becomes more populous and upgrades up, you’ll open new avenues to defend it, like manned artillery turrets and mobile hover tanks. These are just a few of the options we’ve shown in the alpha and there are more planned for the release.


Unite for glory!
To survive in the harsh Void, you’ll have to work with your fellow citizens! The Tomorrow Children uses a unique asynchronous multiplayer system in which players exist in the town, but only appear in your world when they’ve interacted with something in theirs. As projected clones, you only appear to all when you’ve physically changed the world. This creates a unique “connected but disconnected” feeling that makes The Tomorrow Children feel even more otherworldly. It also makes working together more challenging, as you’ll have to pay attention to the needs of the town to understand what your role should be at any given moment.


Alpha test imagineering!
Making each town “Your Town” is one of the most exciting things about The Tomorrow Children. We we’re excited to see everything that the players created in the alpha with only the small sample of the tools that were available for the test. I think the video speaks volumes about the crazy stuff people created, so give it a look!


Daily Void news
As I said before, we got mountains of data from the alpha test. We’ve taken a pickaxe and shovel to it and mined some of the most interesting facts for the handy infographic on the right hand side of this page! There are a few things that stand out:

  • The most popular class was the Engineer Commander, followed closely by the Miner and Citizen. Surprisingly, the Combatant was the least favorite of our fellow comrades. Pickaxes over Shotguns, I guess!
  • There were over 396,000 resources collected over the two weeks! That’s a lot of apples!
  • The battle between the Izverg and Projected Clones was heated! Over 36,000 Izverg were toppled, but the Clones suffered equally with around 28,000 deaths. Luckily, fellow Citizens were there to pick us up with 12,000 resurrections!
  • Players were all about the speed, as the mayoral candidate who promised faster vehicles was elected 1,049 times during the test!
Whew! I’m sure that was a lot to take in, but we’ve just scratched the surface of The Tomorrow Children. We’ll be back with more posts as we get closer to launch. We’ll leave you with a little holiday cheer from everyone here at Q-Games!


Be sure to follow us on Twitter @TTCGame, @PixelJunkNews, and @DylanCuthbert for more updates on the project!

Source: EU PlayStation Blog
 

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The Tomorrow Children closed beta starts in January – sign up here!
Get an early taste of Q-Games’ fascinating sandbox adventure

Dylan Cuthbert from Q-Games here! I’m the director of The Tomorrow Children. We just wrapped up a great showing at PlayStation Experience in San Francisco and we’re thrilled with the positive feedback we received from the community.

It was a pleasure to meet everyone and I can’t wait to open the game to the community once again when The Tomorrow Children closed beta starts in January!

The closed beta opens on 21st January and will only be online for a short period of time, so make sure you sign up here*.

As an added bonus, players who participate in the beta will be rewarded with an exclusive costume.



For those of you who are unfamiliar with the game, allow me to explain about what kind of experience you should expect in the retro-futuristic, cold war-themed, post-apocalyptic alternative timeline that is The Tomorrow Children.



The Tomorrow Children is an online social action adventure game that is going to take you somewhere you’ve never been before. In The Tomorrow Children, the surface of the earth is encased in a white shell known as ‘The Void’ – the aftermath of a Soviet experiment gone horribly wrong.

With your online comrades you will brave The Void to collect resources and develop towns, all while defending yourselves against the Izverg – mysterious creatures that emerge from the depths of The Void, destroying everything in their path.



The key to surviving and, more importantly, restoring the world to its former glory requires players to collaborate with comrades to search out the lost DNA in The Void and convert it back into human form, all the while constructing and defending the towns for this new human race to live in, eventually re-populating the world!

Here’s a special message from The Void:


We can’t wait to play together next month in the closed beta, and if you missed our live demo of the game at PlayStation Experience, you can watch the replay here.


Bourgeoisie unite!



*SCEE/European players only -Japan, Asia and North American players will need to sign up in their home territory

Source: The Tomorrow Children closed beta starts in January – sign up here!
 

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The Tomorrow Children open beta weekend starts this Friday
Get an early taste of Q-Games’ upcoming PlayStation sandbox adventure

Greetings, loyal comrades! Dylan Cuthbert from Q-Games here. Following the success of our closed beta in January, we are hosting an open weekend for The Tomorrow Children, from 9.00am BST/10.00am CET this Friday, 3rd June until 9.00am BST/10.00am CET Monday 6th June, to give as many people as possible a chance to experience the game for themselves, and to help give their all in service to our glorious nation and help restore civilisation!

Of course, we realise that this will be the first venture into the Void for many of you and do not want to send you off to labour without being properly educated. Study the following information closely!



The Void
The true nature of the Void is a mystery, but it will claim those who stray too far from the stabilizing fields in towns. Be sure to use the bus to travel safely to islands.

Islands
The resources needed to expand and maintain towns, as well as Matryoshka Dolls in need of rescue, are found on the strange islands that surround towns. Take your tools and travel there to toil in service of our nation!

Power
Towns require electric power to function. Build and use Treadmill Generators to keep them going!




Coupons
Go to the Ministry of Labour to receive Ration Coupons in exchange for your hard work. These coupons are traded at kiosks for a variety of items needed for doing more work!

Defence
Towns are under constant threat of attack by the Izverg, monsters of unknown origin. Build turrets and arm yourselves to turn them away!

Cooperation
Remember that all comrades are working together for the common good. Items on the ground and stored resources can be used freely by all!

As your time in the Void grows, we are sure that you will learn what kind of service suits you best. We will of course support you as well, but it is the duty of all comrades to become stronger in mind, body, and spirit for the glory of all!



Join us on our Twitch channel on Friday 3rd June at 9.00am BST/10.00am CET and Monday 6th June at 2.00am BST/3.00am CET, where we’ll be covering the basics and tricks, general Q&A and talk sessions with the staff.

The beta client is now available to download from PlayStation Store, and we’ll see you in the Void in a couple of days!

Source: The Tomorrow Children open beta weekend starts this Friday
 

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If the price of this game follows there previous titles then I may pick it up, I know it's a beta and anything could change before release but it felt like it could get repetitive after a while, saying that it helped pass a Sunday afternoon.

I could also see this working well as a Vita title.
 

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If the price of this game follows there previous titles then I may pick it up, I know it's a beta and anything could change before release but it felt like it could get repetitive after a while, saying that it helped pass a Sunday afternoon.

I could also see this working well as a Vita title.
Agreed re; Vita title. Can't honestly see me spending much time on it otherwise.
Planning to resurrect the Vita very shortly as there's a few great (free / PS+) titles on it now.
 

Martok

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Eccentric sandbox adventure The Tomorrow Children is now free-to-play on PS4
Coincides with new major update and release of Frontier Pack DLC

It’s been almost 2 months since we launched The Tomorrow Children and already we have seen some great success thanks to the hard labor and commitment of our proletariat founders who quickly took to our cause.

We have seen all sorts of activities from the players that we have never imagined before, such as a strange sea of letters, and 3D platformer-like play with the trampolines and also group picnics in the void. There have also been other such antics such as human ladders (when a player kneels and another player kneels on top of them and so on and so on until they are a strange human chain of kneeling clones leading up into the sky). And other people simply enjoy trying to stack boxes as high as they will go!





The community has been vibrant, and we have seen some surprising statistics since launch:


Global Statistics

  • Izverg Destroyed: 1,716,528
  • Matryoshkas Revived: 999,139
  • Towns restored: 1,518
Top ranking player records (Cumulative):
  • Resource collected: 54,846
  • Izvergs destroyed: 15,981
  • Facilities built: 3,057
  • Number of Matryoshka revived: 5,040
  • Towns visited: 573
  • Missions accepted: 1,287
  • Puzzle completed: 4,423
  • Distance walked: 7,012,089
  • Number of bus rides: 3,687
Now, the moment is finally here!

It gives me great pleasure to announce that that The Tomorrow Children will be free for everyone to download and play tomorrow, 26th October. Alongside it, we will also be releasing the “Frontier Pack” which will come with the Bourgeoisie papers, Lv1. Arms License, Lv1. Tools License, EagleCorp Jetpack, 3 avatars and 500 Freeman dollars. Those of you who are PS Plus members will also be provided with an exclusive costume!

To celebrate this launch, we will be providing a bonus costume for a limited time! Login to the stage between 26th October and 2nd November in order to claim the costume.



We have also released a major update to the game, not only to address some of the user feedback we have been receiving but also simply to add a great selection of new content to the game. We’ll be adding new islands, tools, costumes, void powers, facilities, missions and much more. The megaphone, for example, allows for improved communication and will help players cooperate better.



We’ll be adding more updates, so be sure to follow Twitter and PlayStation. com for more details.

We look forward to seeing you in the void!

Source: Eccentric sandbox adventure The Tomorrow Children is now free-to-play on PS4
 

Martok

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The Tomorrow Children shuts down in November
Just over a year after it came out.

The Tomorrow Children shuts down on 1st November, Sony has announced.

That's the day online services for the PlayStation 4 exclusive end - just over a year after the game came out.

Q-Games' quasi MMO town-building tower-defense sandbox game promised much but struggled at launch. Our Chris Donlan gave The Tomorrow Children a go for a few days in September and found it a fascinating experience, if not a particularly rousing ride: "There is something so carefully made, so lovingly crafted about The Tomorrow Children, that I found it hard to set aside even when I wasn't having much of what you might traditionally call fun."

On 28th September, Sony will pull The Tomorrow Children from the PlayStation Store and remove the Founders Pack and Freeman Dollars from sale. Given the nature of the game, you won't be able to play The Tomorrow Children after the service ends on 1st November.

"There is only a short amount of time remaining, however The Tomorrow Children development and operations team hope that you can all continue to enjoy our title until the end of service," reads a note on the Japanese PlayStation website.

"And we would like to extend our thanks and best wishes to you all who continue to enjoy and play our game."

Source: The Tomorrow Children shuts down in November
 

yinkin

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It was an interesting idea, but absolutely zero fun in practice, I am not sure that maybe the idea was sunk by going free to play and that made it more of a grind than it needed to. It was also hampered by terrible instructions.
 
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