PS4 Days Gone Collector’s and Special editions detailed ahead of PS4 exclusive’s launch on 26th April

Martok

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Plus get a closer look at the Farewell Wilderness, the sprawling open world setting for the upcoming action-adventure

Today, in the first of a series of three videos, we offer you a look at the Farewell Wilderness, the setting for Days Gone, a unique landscape that is as beautiful as it is dangerous.

Travelling the abandoned highways of the Farewell Wilderness is deadly. You’ll pass through thick forests of ponderosa and pine (filled with wolves), venture into naturally formed lava tube caves (filled with Freakers), and ride up steep trails to snow-covered peaks offering spectacular vistas (mind the Marauders – and Freakers — and cougars). Riding the broken roads through Days Gone offers landscapes that change quickly and dramatically, a living, breathing world – filled with things trying to kill you.

The breathtaking natural beauty of Oregon’s High Desert, scarred by ancient volcanic activity, shaped in modern times by a dubious history of mining and logging, has long been a recreational area for outdoor enthusiasts who love to hike, camp, fish and backpack.

During the pandemic that killed the world, tens of thousands of survivors fled into the wilderness not realising that it was no safer than the homes, cabins, truck stops, saw mills and small towns they left behind.

Freakers, drawn to mass graves dug throughout the Farewell Wilderness, were everywhere. Swarms of Freakers, Hordes of Freakers – all looking to feed. Throw in marauding groups of human enemies looking to rob and pillage everyone in their path, wildlife – infected or not – starving for food, and crazed cultists terrorizing anyone who won’t join them – and our love letter to the region begins to sound more like a eulogy.


Keep an eye on the PlayStation YouTube channel over the upcoming weeks for more videos highlighting other key features in Days Gone.

Pre-order bonuses, Special and Collector’s editions
Head over to your favourite retailer and pre-order the game now. At launch you’ll receive a voucher to unlock the Drifter Crossbow and upgrades for your drifter bike’s Nitrous, Gas Tank, and Shroud early in the game which will help you survive as you ride the broken road.

Check out the video below to see these bonuses in action.


We are proud to offer a Collector’s edition and Special edition.

The Special Edition features a steelbook, physical soundtrack and a 48 Page mini-art book by Dark Horse Comics. Our Collector’s Edition features everything from the Special Edition plus a Collector’s Edition statue, set of patches, 6 pins and 4 decals.

days_gone_collectors_edition.jpg


days_gone_special_edition.jpg


Source: Days Gone Collector’s and Special editions detailed ahead of PS4 exclusive’s launch on 26th April
 

Martok

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Hands-on with Days Gone’s treacherous, unpredictable open world
There's no such thing as a routine mission in Bend Studio's upcoming post-apocalyptic PS4 exclusive


I’ve been counting the days until I could dig deeper into the post-apocalyptic world of Days Gone (note: it’s been 288 days). I talked Bend Studio into setting me loose in an updated build of the PS4 survival-action game due out on PS4 26th April. My hands-on time proved there’s more (much, much more) here than meets the eye.

My trek through Farewell, Oregon kicked off about an hour into the game. As biker-mercenary Deacon St. John, I stepped into a deadly open world populated by flesh-eating Freakers and roving bandits. A plethora of activities awaited me: bounty hunting, clearing out Freaker nests, investigating the fate of Deacon’s wife, and settling old scores.

These missions fit into threads dubbed, fittingly, “Storylines.” Storylines are Days Gone’s answer to the well-worn “quest” structures found in other open-world adventures. Tired of chasing a quest thread? Just hop to another Storyline and be on your way – the other stuff will be waiting for you when you’re good and ready. In a nice touch, you can access your Storyline progress anytime via a quick swipe across your DualShock 4’s touchpad.

Days Gone
Bend Studios’ decision to set the game in the developer’s backyard, US Pacific Northwest, was a wise one. The snow-capped mountains, sprawling trails, vast forests, and sand-swept high deserts are almost otherworldly in their beauty.

But danger is always close. I’m a few minutes into my play session, cruising the open road. I catch a flash of movement — the telltale red flicker of a laser sight — and before I can inhale I’m knocked off my bike by a marksman hidden in a tree ahead. As Deacon climbs to his feet, a crew of hatchet-wielding bandits close in to finish the job.

This was no scripted encounter, but a reminder that in Days Gone’s unpredictable world, threats can emerge in surprising ways. (postscript: I kicked their asses).

Later, I’m clearing out an ambush camp, using my SMG, Molotovs, and stealth kills to methodically take out the marauders lurking within. It’s routine stuff. I wipe out the lead baddy, grab his tire iron to redeem for a reward, and start to loot the immediate surroundings. So far, so good. That’s when five, then 10, then 20, then 50 Freakers leap up directly in front of me, drawn in by the commotion.

I stumble backward, blinking in disbelief as I blindly fire my SMG at the ever-growing crowd — doing a perfect imitation of every bad guy in every zombie movie moments before they’re ripped to pieces. I realize my only hope is to run for it. I sprint for my bike and have a moment to curse myself for parking it facing a wall, before I’m instantly overcome by a tidal wave of snapping jaws and flailing limbs. It’s an epic ending to an otherwise routine mission. In Days Gone, there’s no such thing.

Days Gone

A few other details that caught my eye:

Have an escape plan. You’ve got a gun, a bike, and a mission. Now all you need is a bug-out plan for when a Freaker horde descends through like a locust swarm. Where you park your bike, and what direction it’s pointed in when you do, is often more important than your weapon loadout. And remember: your bike is your save point!

A quick note on weapons. Weapons come in five different flavors, ranging from Level 1 (“Junk”) to Level 5 (“Special Forces Condition”). Days Gone gives generous and on-the-fly stat comparisons, but it won’t always pay to go for the highest DPS. Bullet penetration takes on life-or-death importance in Days Gone, letting you blast through Freaker ranks without burning through all your ammo.

Don’t kill time. You know the routine, honed over countless open-world games. You clean out an enemy outpost, then slowly tour the carnage, picking up every spare bullet, bandage, and crafting item that isn’t bolted down. In Days Gone, this approach can end in tragedy thanks to a roving Freaker swarms, infected wolves, or “Rager” bears. Be ready to grab whatever’s handy, and make a clean getaway at the first sign of trouble.

CQC basics. Melee scraps in Days Gone feel desperate and wild-eyed, with blows carrying real weight. You tap R2 to land knife slashes and axe swings on nearby melee combatants; Deacon auto-targets nearby foes, but you’ll need to press R1 to roll-dodge past incoming attacks. Throughout it all, you’ll need to monitor Deacon’s stamina bar.

Days Gone

The care and fueling of bikes. Bike reality #1: You’ll need to keep it gassed up. Duh. In a pinch, you can usually find gas cans around houses and buildings, or inside marauder camps. Of course, it’ll pay to upgrade your gas tank ASAP. Bike reality #2: your bike isn’t invincible; bang it up enough and it’ll stall out, forcing an emergency field repair. Drive safe, people!

Let’s get physical. Speaking of bikes, Days Gone isn’t trying to be an offroad motorbike simulator, but you’ll want to master its physics system so you can get the hell out of Dodge when the Freaker hordes descend. Rule #1: When making a jump, try to keep your bike parallel to the ground to minimize damage.

Hunting and gathering. You can hunt for food — deer, wolf, and more — then trade the meat in at encampments to earn credits and trust. You’ll want to build trust at encampments to unlock more potent upgrades for your bike and weapons.

Touching interface. You can access all critical menus (map, skills, Storylines, etc.) by swiping the touchpad across the four cardinal directions. It’s a futuristic touch, and one I’d love to see other games adopt. Another immersive touch: emergency radio transmissions broadcast via DualShock 4’s internal speaker.

Skills and experience. Advancing Storylines and drop enough enemies, and you’ll gain skill points that you can invest across three skill trees: ranged combat, melee combat, and survival. I became a more formidable fighter with skills that let me quickly execute enemies after breaking free from grapples, repairing damaged melee weapons, and gaining damage boosts. That’s just small sample — the skill trees looked pretty beefy.

It’s clear Bend Studio has been hard at work on the presentation, too. Days Gone shows off meticulously detailed rustic environments on PS4 Pro, complete with lush foliage, crumbling bluffs, and dust-choked roads. Look closely, and you’ll even see the individual pine needles that carpet many outdoor locations.

Bend Studio has leaned into the unpredictable threats and encounters that honeycomb this menacing open world. A powerful weapon, a fast bike, and a stock of supplies will only get you so far – you need to expect the unexpected if you want to survive when Days Gone hits PS4 on 26th April.

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NVranya

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I'm only semi intrigued, the theme sounds too familiar by now, so it would depend on how they execute it.

And looking at this, doesn't speak in their favor to me:
These missions fit into threads dubbed, fittingly, “Storylines.” Storylines are Days Gone’s answer to the well-worn “quest” structures found in other open-world adventures. Tired of chasing a quest thread? Just hop to another Storyline and be on your way
Doesn't sound like something really new. They just call it differently, but they're still quests, and leaving therm and returning isn't something new either. It would've been better if the world just progresses as if you're not there and the quests - sorry, "storylines" - became obsolete.

We'll see.
 

Martok

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I'm only semi intrigued, the theme sounds too familiar by now, so it would depend on how they execute it.
Indeed, the execution is the key. If there's a story here and you get to know the character as a real person with feelings and what motivates him then it may work. The Last of Us succeeded in part because of the story and the characters who you could sympathise with (and in some ways relate to).

Doesn't sound like something really new. They just call it differently, but they're still quests, and leaving therm and returning isn't something new either. It would've been better if the world just progresses as if you're not there and the quests - sorry, "storylines" - became obsolete.
I've looked a little more into this and it appears as though this description doesn't tell the whole story (as yes, you are right that storylines do sound like quests from this). I found this:

Ross: I’m glad you noticed the Storylines. We wanted to make sure there was very little dissonance in the open world and the story. We haven’t really shown a lot of the main story yet, but everything you do in this world matters for an important reason. The Storylines mechanics was a way to kinda emphasize advancing the smaller threads in the larger storyline. It’s a way for us to connect the open world activities that the player is doing and kinda frame it in a way that shows why it matters. There is a really tight integration between the two–the story and the open world systems.

So there's a couple of things we've done - everything in the game is tonally consistent so everything you're doing in the open world relates directly to the thesis of the game, which is, what would you do to survive and what kind of an impact will that have on you and how you can make the world a better place and how do you survive in a world that's constantly trying to kill you? We don't have a lot of goofy side activities or side characters you meet in the open world because the world's just too dangerous, you're not going to be able to run into them. So having everything you're doing in the world being centred around the survivor encampments and trying to make the world safe around them those feed back into the core storylines and having a really strong narrative that is told through cutscenes and voice over in a way that is easy to follow because of the storylines featured.

It's kind of like how you consume media now, and this is something that's only just happened in the last five years, where you're like "Oh hey here's this whole series that's dropped" and I'm jumping back and forth between series and having the Storyline Feature is a way that's kind of like streaming media that lets you keep track of which story you're in and where you're at. So when you see something on the map, and it's like, oh here's this icon that represents a continuation of the Sarah storyline and then you can jump into that and experience that flashback and see where that happens in the storyline.

So it sounds like what you are generally doing in the open world will affect what is happening in any storyline you are following and that if you jump from storyline to storyline then where you are at with any of these will affect the other ones.

The proof will be in the pudding, I guess. I'll see what the reviews say once it is released (as I'll be engrossed with The Division 2 anyway) and if it looks like it's a hit then I might pick it up at some point.
 

NVranya

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Too often I've heard that "it'll influence the story", hardly ever does except some cutscene or other minor things.
But yes, we'll just have to wait and see.
 

Plaxinator

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I quite like the look of this. Will also be watching for reviews when it comes out and keep an eye out for a price drop if I like it.
 

benedikt_KGB

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i'm intrigued by this, ill prob get this day one as I like shiny new things :D
 
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